Podcast: A Difficult Call to Discipleship

Here’s a passage packed with dramatic moments like “get behind me, Satan” and “take up your cross and follow me.”

For the second Sunday in Lent, I preached from Mark 8:31-9:1.  The lectionary reading did not include Mark 9:1, but I felt it was important to add that verse to get the full effect of Jesus’s words to his disciples.

Here’s the message title, “A Difficult Call To Discipleship.” I hope it’s helpful.

Podcast: Inheriting the Kingdom

6052391843_0f826d8fde_b

Last Sunday I preached from Matthew 25:31-46, the story of the separation of the sheep and the goats. After Jesus places the sheep on his right and the goats on his left, he turns to the sheep and delivers this message —

‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world. 35 For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, 36 I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’

Of course, that sounds like all we have to do is feed, give water, take in strangers, clothe people, visit the sick and those in prison and we get to go to heaven. But, who were those in the first century who were hungry, thirsty, strangers, naked, sick, and imprisoned. Because knowing who they were gives us insight into why this is Kingdom work. Here’s the audio —

 

Podcast: Thanksgiving and Faith

article_24442

Yesterday I preached from Luke 17:11-19, on the healing of the 10 lepers. You remember the story: Jesus healed 10 lepers, but only 1 of them returned to thank him. But, there is certainly more to this lesson in thanksgiving. Here’s the audio which runs about 16 minutes. I hope you and yours have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

Podcast: Connected to the Past, Facing the Future

West-Main

From Joshua passing the river Jordan with the Ark of the Covenant, 1800, by Benjamin West. Wikipedia.

Last Sunday, November 5, 2017, I preached from Joshua 3:7-17, the account of Joshua leading the Israelites across the Jordan River. Joshua was connected to the past because he and Caleb were the only ones of their generation to endure and reach the promised land. But, Joshua was also a new leader for a new day in a new place. God’s promise to Joshua was “I will be with you as I was with Moses.” Here’s the audio of “Connected to the Past, Facing the Future,” which has insight for our churches today. I hope you find it helpful.

Leaving Facebook soon…NOT

UPDATE: I have decided to stay on Facebook and make changes to my security settings. Long story. Thanks for sticking around with me!

For those of you who follow my blog, ChuckWarnock.com, on Facebook, I will be leaving Facebook permanently soon. I am on Instagram @chuckwarnock and hope to find a community of goodwill there. If you would like to continue to subscribe to my blog and sermons, etc, please enter your email address on the home page. Thanks! -Chuck

Podcast: I am your brother, Joseph

JOSEPH RECOGNIZED-JOHN CHARLES TARDIEU-C. 1788-large

Today I preached from Genesis 45:1-15. It’s the story of Joseph revealing himself to his brothers who do not recognize him. Of course, there’s a lot to this story, and it’s one of the great stories of the Hebrew Bible.

It is also a timely story for the circumstances we in the United States are facing today. Where Joseph could have demanded retribution and revenge because his brothers sold him to passing merchants, he instead offers grace, mercy, and peace. Joseph is able to do this because he realized that God was at work in the life of his family and the nation. By offering forgiveness and reconciliation Joseph turns the brothers’ guilt and his father’s grief into joy and unity. I also ran across a great story that I think you’ll enjoy. Here’s the audio podcast:

 

After Charlottesville

charlottesville-protests-8-rt-jt-170812_1_12x5_992

Photo credit: ABC News

Yesterday I preached on the story of Joseph and his brothers from Genesis 37. Arrogant Joseph with his multicolored coat, and his brothers who plotted to kill him when they saw him coming. This story resonates in light of the violence and hatred and death in Charlottesville, Virginia, just 110-miles north of where I live.

Joseph and his brothers illustrate the worst in our society today — division, hate, racism, and violence. Often, our first knee-jerk response to those with whom we disagree is to violent, vengeful thoughts. This Joseph story — with its division, hatred, and violence — is as old as humanity, and sadly often repeated.

Here’s the audio of my sermon yesterday. It’s only 18-minutes, but I think you’ll find it helpful. This is not about confederate monuments or free speech or political parties — its about violence, hatred, and vengefulness. These are never morally right, whether the cause is repugnant or righteous. Jesus has called his followers to respond in a totally different way from our society’s default to violence. Listen and tell me what you think. And pray for Charlottesville…and our nation.