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 I spoke at a conference last year where I told our church’s story about how we were attempting to transform our community.  I mentioned that we had started a Boys and Girls Club in our church.  During the Q&A after my talk, I was asked, “How many people in your church are actually involved with what you’re doing?”  Fair question, and my response was “about 10%.”  The questioner acted as if 10% really didn’t count as “the whole church” being involved.  Which got me to thinking about spears.

A spear has a sharp point, not a broad blade.  Most of the time in churches we think we need a broad blade — lots of people involved in every ministry we start.  But, when you really think about it, new ministries mostly are “spear-shaped.”  The leading edge of the spear is sharp, pointed, and thin.  

Behind that sharp point the spear fans out into a triangle shape.  Broader support to give heft to the sharp point of the spear.  That’s the way I see innovative ministry — a few people take the lead with the support of a wider group behind them.  Every challenge doesn’t need a broad blade; some challenges call for the sharp point of the spear.  

So, the next time someone seems to question the legitimacy of a ministry because “everybody” is not involved, remind them of the spear.  Sometimes all you need is a sharp point.