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Millennial Makeover I just finished reading Millennial Makeover: MySpace, YouTube & the Future of American Politics. The authors, Morley Winograd and Michael Hais, contend that Millennials will reshape American politics, possibly as early as this election in 2008. Millenials are the newest generation, born 1982-2003, and were given their generational name by the book, Millennials Rising: The Next Generation, published in 2000.

I was so captivated by Millennial Makeover, that I ordered 4 books by Neil Howe and William Strauss, authors of Millennials Rising, and the experts in the field of generational studies. I’ll pull together some thoughts on all these books as I read through them, but let me tell you why I have this new, urgent interest in this newest generation. Read this paragraph and I think you’ll understand:

Overall, only 12 percent of Americans describe themselves as atheist or agnostic or don’t identify with any particular religious tradition. This number is up by just four percentage points since 1987. But age differences in lack of religious belief or affiliation are striking. Within the oldest American generations, the last remaining members of the GI and Silent Generations, just five percent are secular or unaffiliated. That number rises to about one in ten among Baby Boomers to 15 percent of Gen-Xers, and nearly one in five (19%) among Millennials — almost four times the percentage of nonbelievers as existed within the GI and Silent Generations. — Millennial Makeover, p89.

One out of five Millennials — almost 20% — claim no religious affiliation or belief. We have our work cut out for us, we of the church clan. But, it will have to be a different kind of work than we have ever done before. I’m creating a new category (Millennials) and will post thoughts about Millennials and the church in the days ahead.

I am very interested in what you and your church are doing to reach this generation that is now 5-to-26 years of age. Are existing churches going to reach Millennials? Will it take completely new forms of church, like the emerging church scene, to engage this generation? What do you think? What solutions do you see? Or, do you think we’ll continue to lose ground with each new generation?

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